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BobMiller

Stamford Park, Niagara Falls Ontario (1951)

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Read this thing, it's comical as hell...

[IMG]http://i108.photobucket.com/albums/n13/Halffastvideo/TheBat1951.jpg[/IMG]

I love the last paragraph where it states he's driving a borrowed car... I wonder why? :whistle:

It's my belief that stuff like this would actually work at bringing new people in again.

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[quote name='BobMiller' timestamp='1329390052' post='364373']
Read this thing, it's comical as hell...

[img]http://i108.photobucket.com/albums/n13/Halffastvideo/TheBat1951.jpg[/img]

I love the last paragraph where it states he's driving a borrowed car... I wonder why? :whistle:

It's my belief that stuff like this would actually work at bringing new people in again.
[/quote]

That is comical.

Just in case you guys want to read some history on Stamford Park, here is some links with history and photos.

[url="http://www.merrittvillespeedway.com/memories/stamford_park.htm"]http://www.merrittvillespeedway.com/memories/stamford_park.htm[/url]

[url="http://www.nflibrary.ca/nfplindex/show.asp?id=95692&b=1"]http://www.nflibrary.ca/nfplindex/show.asp?id=95692&b=1[/url]

[url="http://www.nflibrary.ca/nfplindex/show.asp?id=100776&b=1"]http://www.nflibrary.ca/nfplindex/show.asp?id=100776&b=1[/url]

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thanks Bob for starting this thread and Frank for your contribution. I never believe in these sorts of stunts, I always think the guy must be cheating somehow...

I've read the article on the Merrittville page before. Unfortunately this track is not listed on the Ghost Speedways website, so I guess that means that it has been built over top of. What I'm wondering is where exactly it was located as I live very near the part of Niagara Falls that is called Stamford. I'd love to know more of the detailed history of the track, when it closed and what is built on that land today. From the library photos it looked like a fairly impressive facility for those days...

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Gotta love the state of the art grandstands here. :thumbsup:

http://www.nflibrary.ca/nfplindex/data/9/2/95692-513843.jpg

NiagaraRaceFan...

Diving into Stamford very briefly, it looks like the track was located at the intersection of Mountain Rd. and Dorchester Rd., on the property that would be known to locals as Firemans Field. The track was built to run ponies and then started running cars in 1948. Auto racing stopped after someone was killed there... still trying to confirm the year, but I believe it might have been November 1st, 1952.

If anyone can add more to this or fix any errors, please feel free to do so.

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I just located this article about horse racing at Stamford that kind of tells the whole story. I was 80% right, the last day of racing (or anything for that matter) at Stamford Park was Labor Day, 1952 but it was a horse race. This article was written in September of 1956. Read on...

[quote]IT'S ONLY a few days more than four years ago when Black Pigeon, Joe Vina up, was led into the winners circle before a-crowd of 12,843 persons, who had wagered a record of S403.146 that day. It was at Stamfords Park after the eighth race on Labor Day, 1952. And that was the last day for thoroughbred racing at Stamford.

Today there's virtually nothing left on the scene. The big layout of barns and stables have long since been torn down. The big steel and concrete
grandstand, completed in 1947, is no more than a heap of rubble with only a few steel pillars remaining. The paddock and jockey quarters have disappeared; the rickety old Judges' stand is gone along with the odds board and fences enclosing the track. The racing strip itself is overgrown with weeds.

The area probably will be turned into a housing developnicnt. a shopping center, or both. Stamford has gone the way of other Ontario ovals— Hamilton, Dufferin, Thorncliffe and Long Branch—into oblivion, the four making way for the new super-tracks at Fort Erie and New Woodbine. And yet, in its hey-day, Stamford could hold its head high. The total wagering for the 14-day meeting in 1952 was $3,282,871 and, while not up to the stratospheric figures set at Fort Erie this summer, still was impressive.

STAMFORD PARK had its beginning in 1922 when P. G. Demetre, a Montreal sportsman, and Thomas Duggan joined financial forces to build a track just outside Niagara Falls, Ont. Completed in time for a late fall meeting on October 13th, 1923 — the venture could hardly be termed a big success. The Grandstand then seated just 1200 (it was far from being filled), the track was just a half miler and the stables accommodated just 250 horses.

TWO OTHER Montrealers became associated with the track, Harry Poulos and George Gladianos. Additions were made, the track lengthened to a mile oval and the stands enlarged to seat 1,800 by 1927. For three seasons the track lay idle, however, but racing was reestablished and by 1937, when Dcmetre took over sole control, the "leaky roof circuit track," as the late Bert Collyer used to term it, began to spruce up. In 1945 P.G. Demetre died and his older son, Stratton, took over. Later he was succeeded by a younger son, John — and then things began to hum.

BY 1950 Stamford had new stands, new buildings, a vastly improved racing strip, stabling accommodations for 750 horses and a couple of infield lakes. Shrubs and flowers prettied up. the view. The crowds came thick and fast; so did the money and Stamford was bursting at the seams. Then, E. P. Taylor, Toronto industrialist, and associates stepped into the picture and in a comparatively short space of time the Canadian racing picture changed completely. The new group bought up all Ontario tracks, closed the four above mentioned and started the erection of the new deluxe plants.

BUT THERE'LL be many who won't forget Stamford too quickly. Many will recall the trip to the races during the war years when pleasure travel was restricted and when a journey to the races meant a trolley ride to the end of the line and a jaunt from there to the track by a wagon and horses. Other, too, will remember the track in its'less attractive days — the tottering old wooden stands, the leaky roof, the mud of the parking area. Some will recall the more recent days when it was rivaling Fort Erie in wagering, the advent of the film patrol, the photo finish and the starting gate.

Today, it's just a bit mournful to drive past the spot where the old track once stood. [/quote]

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we took a drive down there today and there is definitely nothing left there that says there was any sort of race track,horse or stock car...nice little park though..at least it wasn't made into industrial land or anything like what other tracks have been made into..

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