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Not sure if anyone saw this and it was already posted (sorry if it was....dated October 1st when I was in Oswego, a friend just sent it to me.)

http://www.nydailynews.com/paid-posts/?prx_t=ARsEAyC4sArqEQA

7 facts about the dirt tracks of Orange County Fair Speedway

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OCT 1, 2018   |   3:17 PM
  
 

7914D6347B6042E198C55A592D2F9FD7.jpg(Photo credit: Orange County Fair Speedway)

Orange County Fair Speedway is one of the hidden gems of the Northeast. From April through October the Middletown, New York, venue is home to races that can quench the thirst for excitement for any RPM enthusiast.

Looking to learn more about one of the nation’s most lauded dirt racks? Here are seven fun facts about Orange County Fair Speedway (OCFS).

         1. Horses before horsepower: Brought to North America by British settlers, the tradition of horse racing in the U.S. pre-dates our country’s existence. Constructed in 1857, OCFS was originally used for that purpose. The first incarnation of the track was called the “Harry Clay Oval” after a famed racehorse of that era.

         2. One man’s vision: In the early 1900s, George Martin, the fair’s social director, began lobbying for the track to be reconstructed for automobile races. After much lobbying, OCFS hosted its first auto race in 1919, with 5,000 spectators in attendance. Nearly 100 years later, OCFS holds the title of the oldest continuously operating dirt race track in the U.S.

         3. An electric atmosphere: Today, OCFS is known as “The House of Power.” Its 5/8-mile oval-shaped, clay track requires frequent upkeep. The surface is rougher and the track is shorter than those of most major racing venues. The track, however, is still long enough that drivers can reach in excess of 150 miles per hour.  

         4. Vehicles of all shapes and sizes: Dirt tracks typically host races for a variety of vehicles, and OCFS is no different. Races at the venue may include modifieds and sprint cars (which appear to be part go-kart, part Formula 1) and street stock (which resemble your family car but pack quite a bit more power).

         5. Drive-in viewing: OCFS offers spectators the chance to observe some of the nation’s fastest vehicles while sitting in their own car or truck. The track’s drive-in entrance allows patrons to park atop a hill overlooking the track. For those who want to be closest to the action, the grandstands are close enough to feel the thunder. (Admission prices vary depending on event.)

         6. Star power grows in the dirt: When you think of famous racecar drivers, who comes to mind? Many famous drivers proved themselves on dirt tracks before moving onto the bright lights of NASCAR. Throughout the years OCFS has played host to many of these drivers who have gone on to national acclaim.

         7. A year-end event: Throughout the season, high-caliber drivers in high-powered vehicles buzz around the oval. The all-star circuit of champions sprint car series, for instance, was at the track this past August. The highlight of the season, however, remains the Eastern States Weekend. That slate of races features the Eastern States 200, the oldest consecutively run championship event for dirt track modified stock cars in the country. The 2018 incarnation of the event runs Oct. 19-21.

—Brendan Murphy for Orange Country Fair Speedway

 
 
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5 minutes ago, Pinesol said:

150 mph?

Maybe in a 410 Sprint, at the end of the straightaway right before they hit the brakes to make the corner?  But yeah, 150mph seems like a stretch... 

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Reaching 150 mph and turning an average lap speed of 150 mph is 2 different things. I agree a 410 Sprint might get real close to 150 in perfect conditions.

It's the 5/8 thing I have an issue with. The article says the track was built to race horses back in the 1850s and nobody disputes that. But fairground horse tracks were 1/2 miles, not 5/8.

The decimal for 5/8 is .625. I measured the extreme outside wall which means it is impossible for the track to be any bigger than that.

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What I don't get is , there is an article on a local dirt track in a major news paper and the only things anyone can up with are negative. Smh

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3 hours ago, FondaFan16 said:

Maybe in a 410 Sprint, at the end of the straightaway right before they hit the brakes to make the corner?  But yeah, 150mph seems like a stretch... 

 

3 hours ago, Pinesol said:

150 mph?

Wikiepedia states Joey Salada has track record 0:16.083 (139.899) average speed, so I would think 150mph is VERY doable at the end of either the front or back stretch.

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16.083 x .625 = 139.899
16.083 x .500 = 111.919

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52 minutes ago, ranger22 said:

What I don't get is , there is an article on a local dirt track in a major news paper and the only things anyone can up with are negative. Smh

Who was being negative?


 

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It's not really an article in a major newspaper.  It's a "Paid Post" written by OCFS and posted to the online Daily News site.  In other words, it's online ad.  The Daily News is barely any kind of newspaper anymore.  They have been gutting their writing staff for several years including coverage of sports to the point their sports staff is down to 9 people.  The New York Daily News doesn't even have a beat reporter for the New York Yankees anymore.

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So using today's time trial time of 22 seconds with the mighty big blocks and their inflated track length of 5/8, the speed would be 102.27 mph.

Using the track length of a .56 miles and 22 second lap times, the speed would be 91.64 mph.

92 mph or 'in excess of 150 mph.' It all works out the same. Maybe a 5/8 mile was longer in 1919? Who knows.😂

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4 hours ago, ranger22 said:

What I don't get is , there is an article on a local dirt track in a major news paper and the only things anyone can up with are negative. Smh

Thanks. Was kinda thinking the same thing....oh well...

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Obviously Middletown isn’t a 5/8 mile. It has been changed a number of times since it opened. NASCAR measures a track 10 feet from the outside wall which is not accurate to distance traveled. 

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8 hours ago, BobMiller said:

16.083 x .625 = 139.899
16.083 x .500 = 111.919

Wow, what exactly does that mean, that  the track is 5/8 of a mile and Saldana ran that speed and time on the very top of the race track? 

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1 hour ago, robertmorris said:

Wow, what exactly does that mean, that  the track is 5/8 of a mile and Saldana ran that speed and time on the very top of the race track? 

It means if the track was really a 5/8, the speed would have been 139 miles per hour. But the track is a half-mile, thus the much lower speed.

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Tracks have been doing this for years. Eldora called itself a half mile for years and now most recognize it’s closer to 4/10ths. 

 

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13 hours ago, 18kylebusch said:

Obviously Middletown isn’t a 5/8 mile. It has been changed a number of times since it opened. NASCAR measures a track 10 feet from the outside wall which is not accurate to distance traveled. 

I measure the very outside edge because it is physically impossible for a track to be any bigger than that. The actual race groove will always be smaller, but that's not the point. I am trying to give as much leeway in track size as possible. 

The 5/8 number used at Rolling Wheels, Orange County and Oswego are wrong. All 3 are half mile tracks and exaggerate track speeds by almost 30mph in press releases and advertising. I took a ride around the Rolling Wheels complex Thursday to see how bad the grounds were from sitting idle all year. One of the first things I noticed was the sign out front saying "Rolling Wheels - the World's fastest dirt track." No it isn't. if you use the right multiplier in the math, the Sprint Car speed drops like a rock and is more realistic.

 

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Went there yest for qualif, the joint looks pretty darn good,track surface looked racy, think 21.2 fast time, new seats w backs,bathrooms upgrades, Buzzzuie R. store,And a soundsystem you can hear!

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I was hoping to get back there this year. Haven't seen the place since before the stage was torn down.

 

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The biggest offender of track length is probably Rome down in Georgia. It bills itself as the world’s fastest half mile and its maybe a 3/8.  

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3 hours ago, BobMiller said:

I measure the very outside edge because it is physically impossible for a track to be any bigger than that. The actual race groove will always be smaller, but that's not the point. I am trying to give as much leeway in track size as possible. 

The 5/8 number used at Rolling Wheels, Orange County and Oswego are wrong. All 3 are half mile tracks and exaggerate track speeds by almost 30mph in press releases and advertising. I took a ride around the Rolling Wheels complex Thursday to see how bad the grounds were from sitting idle all year. One of the first things I noticed was the sign out front saying "Rolling Wheels - the World's fastest dirt track." No it isn't. if you use the right multiplier in the math, the Sprint Car speed drops like a rock and is more realistic.

 

So what you are saying is the documented record set be Joey Saldana at 16.083 and 139.899 mph at Middletown could not have been factually possible due to the fact the track isn't 5/8 of a mile? Not disputing what you are saying, was just trying to understand. The Saldana numbers just don't make sense if the track is only a 1/2 mile.

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21 hours ago, ranger22 said:

What I don't get is , there is an article on a local dirt track in a major news paper and the only things anyone can up with are negative. Smh

I don't agree with you at all. What I'm seeing is an article that posts what they call facts and Bob fact checked it and its very unlikely that 150 mph is reached and absolutely NOT true that the track is 5/8 mile.  I love when people fact check and determine what is actually true and what is total bullshit.

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16 hours ago, Josh Bayko said:

Tons of tracks exaggerate their length.

There are some that do but it doesn't make it right. Don't tell me your giving me a half pound burger when its really only 1/3 lb.  Maybe some of you think that 2 + 2 = 5. Lol.  Next thing you will be asking for proof that its not.

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